sit with it #4 40 x 30″ oil

I had a more developed narrative in mind, I wanted to paint about what I was sitting with. But I posted a progress shot of this one on fb and a couple people including my mother pretty much told me to leave it as is. Which I did.

I mean, I painted the underpainting so there would be a more stable + durable paint layer, but added no more content.

It’s unusual that people ask me to stop on a piece and it also makes perfect sense; we are all sitting with different things in our lives. The painting above makes room for what’s before you and what’s before me too, and is also more about sitting than what one might be sitting with.

There is another taller underpainted canvas sitting and waiting for me that better suits that more explicit narrative anyway, it’s red-orange so a more high-keyed starting place. And that explicit narrative is still nagging at me so I imagine it will indeed get painted next. I bought some canvases right before local art supply stores had to shut down for COVID.

The tree is a water oak, with some resurrection ferns. It looks like it got beat up pretty hard during one of our power outage wind and hailstorms, but it rallied.

The chair is a classic “Kentucky chair”— my mother collects them and they show up in her paintings, though she paints all kinds of chairs and does not play favorites.

I love looking at them, both the chairs and her paintings. In use, Kentucky chairs tend to creak like an old tree or an wood house in the wind, which can alarm folks not familiar with the chair type. In general people don’t want their chairs to squeak and flex underneath them.

Here is one of my mother’s paintings with Kentucky chairs, called “pinky swear” – it is 4 x 5′

About it's still raw

Angie Reed Garner www.angiereedgarner.com writing on art, anti-racism, and Buddhist practice in no particular order I work with Stand Up Sunday-Stand Up Louisville under the supervision of Black Lives Matter Louisville. https://www.facebook.com/standuplouisville/

One response to “sit with it #4 40 x 30″ oil”

  1. Philip Martin says :

    I like this, and the fact that its unfinished state is the finished state. I find it funny–I have another painter friend who talks about knowing when paintings are done. I can’t see that, but I can certainly “see” when a poem or essay is done.

    Thanks for sharing your mom’s painting, too. And about Kentucky chairs. I’d never heard of those, before. But as a friend reminds me, “you’re such a Yankee.”

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